Belay Specs Blog

This blog has less to do with Belay Specs and more to do with our employee's climbing and outdoor outings.  We'll talk about exciting news about Belay Specs but we'll talk much more about the trips we've taken and the places we've checked out.  We'd like to share some of our experiences in the hope that they inspire you to check the areas out for yourselves. If you read about an area or activity in one of our posts and have questions on beta, route recommendations or anything else, leave a comment and we'll try to fill you in.

Maybird Gulch in Little Cottonwood Canyon is another cliff developed by Greg Martinez and detailed in the paper guides of his routes sold at IME in Salt Lake City. My friend Buddy wanted to get out for a half day so we cruised up to check out Maybird Gulch. We parked the car and looked up at the bare stone in the obvious gulch above us. It looked like a long way but the hike only takes about 15 minutes. I wasn’t super excited about the rock but it climbed okay. The rock is blocky and climbs more like the quartzite found Big Cottonwood Canyon than the granite found in most of Little Cottonwood. The routes are well bolted, a little bit soft so they stroke the ego and are good for the budding leader or those needing to get their lead head back.

Buddy and I started warmed up on Purple Haze (5.9+) then did Drop Out (5.10c), which splits off of Purple Haze after a few bolts and goes to the anchors of Collie Buddz (5.10b), our next route. Drop Out and Collie Buddz both have funky roof moves in the middle and share a tough little move protecting the anchors.

Feeling good and loose, we walked up to the next group of climbs and got on Bubbles & Booze (5.11-). It is a nice little route with a definite crux ⅔ of the way up. It’s nothing too hard but requires some long moves and high feet. We then each took a run up Squeeze It Until It’s Purple (5.10c). Buddy decided to not use a big hold out right for some reason and found it to be a little bit tougher than I did. Again, a decent route but nothing that really blew me away. I’m excited to get back up here with my wife to help her work on her lead head and get the cobwebs out.

What our users have to say

After wearing these belay glasses for one day, we felt like idiots we didn't get a pair sooner! Seriously, anyone who climbs (and subsequently belays) should have a pair! They work for ALL climbs (not just steep ones), saving the neck, and providing a safer belay because your belayer can actually keep watching you from nearly any angle. In fact, the ability to view your climber from almost any direction and have good peripheral vision means even if you catch yourself eying another climber on your project, you can still keep your eye on your climber at the same time! 

Ben and Lindsey Kunz, Seattle, WA. Read more at her blog

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